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Ross Henderson

SALMON PADDLE BY ROSS HENDERSON

$850.00

“Salmon” in Red Cedar, with acrylic paint. Hand carved by artist Ross Henderson. Measuring 5 feet high.

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KILLER WHALE PADDLE BY ROSS HENDERSON

$850.00

“Killer Whale” in Red Cedar, with acrylic paint. Hand carved by artist Ross Henderson. Measuring 5 feet high.

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WOLF PADDLE BY ROSS HENDERSON

$850.00

“Wolf Paddle” in Red Cedar, with acrylic paint. Hand carved by artist Ross Henderson. Measuring 5 feet high.

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HUMMING BIRD PADDLE BY ROSS HENDERSON

$850.00

“Humming Bird Paddle” in Red Cedar, with acrylic paint. Hand carved by artist Ross Henderson. Measuring 5 feet high.

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BEAR PADDLE BY ROSS HENDERSON

$850.00

“Bear Paddle” in Red Cedar, with acrylic paint. Hand carved by artist Ross Henderson. Measuring 5 feet high.

$850.00Add to cart

RAVEN PADDLE BY ROSS HENDERSON

$850.00

“Raven Paddle” in Red Cedar, with acrylic paint. Hand carved by artist Ross Henderson. Measuring 5 feet high.

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OWL PADDLE BY ROSS HENDERSON

$850.00

“Owl Paddle” in Red Cedar, with acrylic paint. Hand carved by artist Ross Henderson. Measuring 5 feet high.

$850.00Add to cart

Ross Henderson has been carving since the age of 16. His great grandfather is Gidion Whonnock, a world renowned totem pole carver. At a young age Henderson had the opportunity to see his grandfather working and began learning traditional songs from Chief Frank Nelson while participating in potlaches and cultural events.
He started carving at the Thunderbird Park Carving Shed, on the Royal British Columbia Museum grounds in Victoria, BC.  In his current practice he is inspired to create paddles, Hamat’sa masks and totem poles.

“I will continue to carve with respect to the ways my father has taught me with the proper protocol in the way things are done. I will do my best to preserve and restore what I can of my culture as I feel an obligation to make sure there will be something left for my children and for future generations of the Kwakwala speaking people.” – Ross Henderson